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Oct 30

Week 3 Preview

The waiver wire isn’t quite as bountiful as it was in Week 1 and 2, but there’s still some very intriguing options out there who could become long-term impact players. If your team is struggling, especially your early-round players, you shouldn’t panic. Studs usually end up producing around their career averages. If your late-round picks that you thought would hit haven’t, then it’s probably time to say goodbye. Usually, by this point, it’s at least somewhat evident that a player is going to breakout. This is also the best time to send out buy-low offers. There’s usually at least one manager in your league who doesn’t understand the concept of patience. Take advantage of that.

Week 3 Schedule and Notes:

 

  ATL BKN BOS CHA CHI CLE DAL DEN DET GSW HOU IND LAC LAL MEM
Week 3 3 2 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4
MIA MIL MIN NOR NYK OKC ORL PHI PHO POR SAC SAS TOR UTA WAS
Week 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 3
  • The Nets are this week’s biggest loser and that takes all their players off the menu in weekly leagues. DeMarre Carroll should still be held and Spencer Dinwiddie is an excellent pickup. However, Caris LeVert can be jettisoned for a hot free agent. His role, and the Nets’ pace and system, makes him an attractive player in theory, but he just isn’t very good at the moment. He was a forgettable per-minute player in his rookie year and despite his obvious talent and above-average athleticism, he hasn’t found a way to score efficiently. Percentages and turnovers matter just as much as any other category, and unless you are punting at least one of those categories, you can almost certainly do better than LeVert.
  • There should be plenty of quality streaming options this week with 19 teams playing four games. Of those 19 teams, the Grizzlies have the easiest schedule. I don’t love James Ennis and Jarell Martin as pickups, but the Western Conference leaders should have a very nice week with the Hornets, Magic, and Lakers on the schedule.

Week 3 Pickups:

Marco Belinelli – Belinelli continues to light it up as the Hawks’ second-best option on offense and is producing fifth-round numbers on the year. The shooting guard has managed this feat by posting elite three-point shooting numbers (3.1 3PG) without dragging down his owners’ FG% (45.3 FG%). He won’t offer much on the defensive end (1.0 SPG, 0.0 BPG), but the veteran is one of the league’s best free-throw shooters and is yet to miss from the charity stripe this season.

Spencer Dinwiddie – Dinwiddie has slid into Jeremy Lin’s old role and the early returns of the move have been fantastic. Over the Nets’ last three games, the guard has produced 13.5 PPG, 1.8 3PG, 6.3 APG, and 1.3 SPG while shooting 48.4% from the field and 89.5% from the line on 4.8 FTA. He won’t continue to be this good, but he’s a great option for those short on point guard numbers due to Lin’s injury. The Nets play at a breakneck pace and as long as Dinwiddie continues to see minutes in the mid-20s, he should be relevant to standard-league managers.

Markieff Morris – This is just a friendly reminder to pick up Morris if he’s still floating around on your wire. The Wizard is still only owned in 52% of leagues and could return later this week. Unless you play in a very shallow league, Morris likely has more upside than anyone else on your wire. Over the last three months of the 2016-2017 season, Markieff was a top-55 option in 9-category leagues and averaged 14.7 PPG, 1.2 3PG, 6.9 RPG, and 0.9 SPG. He is a must-grab in all formats and a dream pickup for those punting FG%.

Ryan Anderson – Anderson started the season very slowly, but exploded in Week 2 to the tune of 19.0 PPG, 5.7 3PG, and a very surprisingly 1.3 BPG. Now obviously none of that is sustainable, but he needs to be owned as long as he is hot. At worst, Anderson will be an elite source of threes who can help you win points. His upside is capped by his lack of defensive stats. Anderson is currently averaging a meager 0.7 SPG and 0.4 BPG. While those numbers are not impressive, they are actually a huge improvement on last season’s averages of 0.4 SPG and 0.2 BPG.

T.J. McConnell – Markelle Fultz is out indefinitely and that means big minutes for McConnell. As we saw last year, he’s not the most well-rounded fantasy asset, but he can contribute big numbers in the assists and steals columns. In 2016-2017 McConnell managed 6.6 APG and 1.7 SPG in 26.3 MPG. Since Fultz was shutdown, McConnell has played 29.8 MPG and has 17 assists and 7 steals in two games. He’s worth a look in standard leagues.

Week 3 Watchlist/Streaming Options/Deep League Pickups:

Marcus Morris – Morris is close to returning to the court and should have a major role for the Gordon Hayward-less Celtics. He was expected to start even before the injury and should slide into the starting lineup once he is up to speed. The opportunity will be there, but what makes Morris only a mediocre option for those playing in deeper leagues is his talent. He’s just not that good. In his final season with the Pistons, Morris played 32.5 MPG but only managed to post top-150 numbers. He’ll score (14.0 PPG) and help you from deep (1.5 3PG), but don’t expect much else.

Kyle Korver – The Cavaliers are a mess, but Korver’s stroke has never been better. The sharpshooter is hitting an impossible 52.9% of his attempts from deep since the season started. This hot shooting has allowed Korver to not only be a great source of threes (2.6 3PG), but to also be a sneaky source of FG% impact (56.5 FG%). He doesn’t play enough minutes these days to be more than a streamer in standard leagues (19.9 MPG), but managers playing in 14-team leagues could do a lot worse.

Domantas Sabonis – The Pacers have been talking up up the young big man and so far, the sophomore has lived up to hype. His numbers are inflated by Myles Turner’s absence, but Sabonis should produce late-round value once his teammate does return to court. Over the Pacers last three games, Sabonis has averaged a double-double (13.7 PPG, 11.3 RPG) while shooting 68.0% from the floor.

Tyson Chandler/Alex Len – Interim coach Jay Triano seems set on the Suns rolling out a traditional lineup and that means that Chandler and Len get to split 48 minutes each night. Chandler is currently the better option. The veteran is only a two-category player these days, but remains excellent both from the field (63.0 FG%) and on the boards (9.2 RPG). Len is also a very good rebounder (8.4 RPG), but sometimes struggles to score efficiently (48.3 FG%). Expect Len’s disappointing blocks (0.6 BPG) to improve. The big man produced 2.3 BP36 in 2016-2017.

E’Twaun Moore – Rajon Rondo is expected to miss another month, and until he does return, Moore is going to get all the minutes that he can handle. Moore has played 32.1 MPG in the Pelicans’ six games and has managed to post top-120 numbers. DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis roaming the paint has led to a ton of open shots for Moore and he’s made the most of the extra space (56.4 FG%). Moore is a solid point guard option for those punting assists (1.8 APG) and can help you win threes (1.8 3PG).

Bogdan Bogdanovic – The Kings look like a strong contender for this season’s first-overall pick and Bogdanovic has been one of the squad’s few bright spots. The 25-year-old rookie has been a top-70 player this season thanks to his excellent swipes (2.0 SPG) and efficient scoring 12.3 PPG on 51.6 FG%. Those are very intriguing numbers, but his European production suggests that neither is sustainable. He’s worth holding until he cools off and could see his value, and playing time, increase as the year goes on. He’s outplayed Buddy Hield and could end up being the Kings’ best option the wing.

Chandler Parsons – To be clear, I’m staying far, far away from Parsons in leagues with 12-teams or less. I’m not even sure I’d touch him in a 14-team league. Anything above that, go nuts. Parsons is still on a minutes limit and could continue to sit out half of back-to-back sets, but for the first time in what feels like years, he’s shown some signs of life. The injury-prone swingman caught fire against his old Houston teammates and dropped 24 points and six threes on the Rockets. He didn’t do much else, but we’ll take what we can get at this point.

Jakob Poeltl – Poeltl has taken advantage of both Jonas Valanciunas’ and Lucas Nogueira’s absences and has been a top-55 player over the last week. Over that span, the sophomore has managed to average 9.5 PPG, 10.5 RPG, 1.0 SPG, and 1.5 BPG. That production won’t continue once everyone is healthy, but Poeltl looks like an elite handcuff who could be rosterable in deeper leagues.

Richaun Holmes – Holmes is a nearing a return and is worth a speculative pickup, especially if you own Joel Embiid. Holmes is a potential league-winning pickup, but could also amount to nothing. There is no guarantee that he surpasses Amir Johnson in the rotation, especially with the Sixers playing so well. If he does managed to beat out the veteran, Holmes should be worth owning in standard leagues. The big man was a top-90 player in only 20.9 MPG last season and has ability to produce in every category except assists and FT%. His best contributions come on the defensive end (1.3 SP36, 1.6 BP36) and from the floor (55.8 FG%).

Jonathon Simmons – Simmons has been a scoring machine since joining the Magic. The problem is that he does almost nothing else. The swingman is averaging a very impressive 16.2 PPG on 52.4% shooting, but has only been a top-130 player this season. Simmons doesn’t do much on the defensive end (0.7 SPG, 0.2 BPG) and is a mediocre rebounder (3.0 RPG) and passer (1.7 APG). He’ll also likely end up being a below-average source of threes once his shooting cools down (1.3 3PG). He’s a much better option in points leagues than he is in category leagues.

Follow me on Twitter @EliteFanBBall for the latest fantasy basketball news. I will gladly answer any fantasy basketball related questions that you may have. 

 

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